My Literacy Journey

Implications for Teaching: Critical Literacy Finds A “Place” in My Classroom

Posted on: May 4, 2010

One of the most powerful articles I read this semester was the Comber et al. article. The authors discuss taking local action based on students’ perceptions, wants, fears, and thoughts about their own neighborhood. This was extremely powerful because the students were able to see that their thoughts and perceptions about their neighborhood truly mattered to their teacher. They also saw literacy and their own writing as a way to take social action and were able to see how literacy and engaging in writing can truly make a difference in their own lives.  This study was very powerful to read and has influenced me to always keep these sort of questions and activities in the back of my mind. Next year, I plan to do a similar activity and ask students:

1) Draw/Write about the best things in your life.

2) Draw/Write about something that makes you really happy.

3) Draw/Write about something that makes you really angry.

4)Draw/Write about something that makes you worried.

5) Draw/Write your three wishes.

6) Draw/Write about something you wish you could change in your neighborhood, school, or world.

Source: Comber, B., Thomson, P., & Wells, M. (2001). Critical literacy finds a “place”: Writing and social action in a low-income Australian grade 2/3 classroom. The Elementary School Journal, 101(4), 451-464.

I can imagine just how informative, powerful, and exciting this activity will be with my future students in the South Bronx. I want students to truly see the power of literacy and just how much what they say and how they feel matters in their worlds.

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1 Response to "Implications for Teaching: Critical Literacy Finds A “Place” in My Classroom"

This is such a powerful way to make critical literacy work meaningful in local settings and to focus on deconstruction, reconstruction, and social action.

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  • None
  • Marjorie Siegel: This can be the greatest lesson of all to take into your career as a teacher!
  • Marjorie Siegel: This is such a powerful way to make critical literacy work meaningful in local settings and to focus on deconstruction, reconstruction, and social act
  • Marjorie Siegel: Another book that offers an excellent guild to critical literacy in a primary grade classroom is Vivian Vasquez's exploration of her own teaching with

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